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Topic: Trembling of the malleus

It is interesting, how many vibrations of the hammer itself are synthesized in the reproduction of sound? After all, the vibration of the hammer is what is the next tool of expressiveness of the instrument. If there are vibrations, most likely there are harmonics. These vibrations make a blow on the string that is biting  then softened. It depends on the phases of the hammer-string state. The impact point is likely to change slightly. These are subtleties, but they have a place to be for professional pianists. A "condition" slider might add hammer-hammering on the axis.

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Re: Trembling of the malleus

I'm not sure if the trembling of the shank and hammer are audible, but this may be the best title for a thread that I have ever seen.

Last edited by Jake Johnson (24-09-2017 21:00)

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Re: Trembling of the malleus

To hear the sound of the trembling of the shank is unlikely) But the effect on the interaction with the string is obvious!

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Re: Trembling of the malleus

This definitely affects the point of impact on the string and the force of impact. And the point changes depending on the state of the hammer. And this is not chaotic as with humanization.

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Re: Trembling of the malleus

Not sure about vibration, but I was interested to learn that the speed at which the hammer rebounds off the strings can greatly affect the tone, according to this:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ivuczNJPubo&t=406s
(it discusses two modifications to an upright - increasing the repetition speed, and increasing the rebound speed)
I thought it was really cute when he pointed out the highly sophisticated new componentry for the repetition "it's that spring there" smile

Jake Johnson wrote:

I'm not sure if the trembling of the shank and hammer are audible, but this may be the best title for a thread that I have ever seen.

I don't know about that - it sounds like some kind of rare nerve condition smile

Greg.

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Re: Trembling of the malleus

skip wrote:

Not sure about vibration, but I was interested to learn that the speed at which the hammer rebounds off the strings can greatly affect the tone, according to this:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ivuczNJPubo&t=406s
(it discusses two modifications to an upright - increasing the repetition speed, and increasing the rebound speed)
I thought it was really cute when he pointed out the highly sophisticated new componentry for the repetition "it's that spring there" smile
Greg.

Very interesting video smile

Mac Pro Quad-Core (2009) 2.66 GHz | 16GB RAM | MOTU PCI-424/2408mk3|MOTU Midi Timepiece AV | Mac OS X 10.9.5 | Cubase 9.0.30.266| and others ;)

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Re: Trembling of the malleus

the repeated sound can be affected by the fact that the path at the hammer decreases. It either starts at a closer distance, or it takes a finger to overcome the energy of the rebound (if the hammer was not caught). But the vibration of the body of the malleus does not disappear anywhere.

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Re: Trembling of the malleus

Interesting...

But I had posted, a year or two ago, a video about a new soundboard design that could make a upright sound very close to a grand piano..
Now I don't know what is more relevant, the soundboard or the speed of the hammer.

ANyway it's difficult to imagine that no piano maker had though abou a sim ple spring before, to solve the key repetition limitation.  But 14 key striks per second it's something that it's rarely used.

skip wrote:

Not sure about vibration, but I was interested to learn that the speed at which the hammer rebounds off the strings can greatly affect the tone, according to this:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ivuczNJPubo&t=406s
(it discusses two modifications to an upright - increasing the repetition speed, and increasing the rebound speed)
I thought it was really cute when he pointed out the highly sophisticated new componentry for the repetition "it's that spring there" smile

Jake Johnson wrote:

I'm not sure if the trembling of the shank and hammer are audible, but this may be the best title for a thread that I have ever seen.

I don't know about that - it sounds like some kind of rare nerve condition smile

Greg.

Last edited by Beto-Music (27-09-2017 15:12)