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Topic: Piano V

We've had V-Piano and other physical modelled pianos built into the hardware, but is this a software rival to Pianoteq?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y2F9YoxWE-0

Last edited by DonSmith (25-05-2017 20:33)

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Re: Piano V

Nope, not even close.

Hard work and guts!

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Re: Piano V

The timbre is somehow not so bad, but for the rest it seems to miss the hammer attack and the physical sound of the snare that goes with it. It seems to have a very unnatural decay too with no room for soundboard resonance too

Worse than pianoteq 1 tongue the lower notes sounds almost motorized smile

Last edited by CosmicD (14-05-2017 19:53)

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Re: Piano V

CosmicD wrote:

The timbre is somehow not so bad, but for the rest it seems to miss the hammer attack and the physical sound of the snare that goes with it. It seems to have a very unnatural decay too with no room for soundboard resonance too

Worse than pianoteq 1 tongue the lower notes sounds almost motorized smile

"Nope, not even close"

Ditto,

Lanny

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Re: Piano V

It all seems premature in comparison to Pianoteq. It generally sounds low like the sound has been muted. A lot of the features feels unfinished, like the inability to know how much you've adjusted a setting. Because it's physically modelled I wonder how easy they'll find it to upgrade, something that has been a strong feature with Pianoteq.

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Re: Piano V

When I first demoed pianoteq, I really was not quite ready to purchase but I was really encouraged because they had so many things right, but especially the C5 and up, and the basses sounded really artificial back then, this has been gradually improved through pianoteq 5, it still is sometimes a bit meh in the high notes but the natural resonating rumble you have when playing a low octave 2 note bass is so satisfying now with pianoteq,

Maybe arturia will find their way after many iteration, but Roland somehow did it more right the first time around smile

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Re: Piano V

DonSmith wrote:

It all seems premature in comparison to Pianoteq. It generally sounds low like the sound has been muted. A lot of the features feels unfinished, like the inability to know how much you've adjusted a setting. Because it's physically modelled I wonder how easy they'll find it to upgrade, something that has been a strong feature with Pianoteq.

Don,
First let me express my appreciation for your fxp contributions, they are among the best I have tried.
Having said that, I agree with your opinion that the version of Piano V on you tube seems premature (even primitive) against Pianoteq.
However Arturia has been producing soft instruments for some time and probably has sufficient resources to catch up and perhaps pass Pianoteq IF they dedicate said resources to it.
The ~$200 price tag is attractive and could be a deciding factor if they catch up (or come close) in some future release.
There can be advantage to introducing unready products and following up with "new and improved" big_smile

Ease of upgrade is MOSTLY a function of the structure of the software's design.
I have NOT been impressed with  Pianoteq's need for a new model just about every time they release a new instrument.
It just "feels wrong" that new instruments can't be added to the existing platform without needing a new (minor) release.

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Re: Piano V

aandrmusic wrote:

However Arturia has been producing soft instruments for some time and probably has sufficient resources to catch up and perhaps pass Pianoteq IF they dedicate said resources to it.

Modartt target only the software, it is fed directly, without resources taken from elsewhere (which proves that it is a self-sustaining strategy) from other products it makes. We don't know about Piano-V yet. I have also read in Arturia own forum critics about the product and how Pianoteq is superior.

Last edited by Lucy (25-05-2017 19:37)

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Re: Piano V

Lucy wrote:
aandrmusic wrote:

However Arturia has been producing soft instruments for some time and probably has sufficient resources to catch up and perhaps pass Pianoteq IF they dedicate said resources to it.

Modartt target only the software, it is fed directly, without resources taken from elsewhere (which proves that it is a self-sustaining strategy) from other products it makes. We don't know about Piano-V yet. I have also read in Arturia own forum critics about the product and how Pianoteq is superior.

We can agree that it isn't (yet) quality competitive with pianoteq, I wasn't arguing that it is.
However the price may excuse its shortcomings and if it is "well engineered" improvements in later versions could be implemented quickly at low (development) cost.
They can probably do better, they probably WILL do better, this isn't a new launch strategy.

I am sure we are all familiar with poor software products that have succeeded (financially) over decades by promising "better" with every version (at LEAST ONE).

Last edited by aandrmusic (26-05-2017 13:16)

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Re: Piano V

Thing is that it is really hard to beat Modartt strategy here. I had a lot of criticism about the product, but their strategy is one of their strongest sides.

200$ as a price tag with what they are offering is comparable to somewhere between Pianoteq stage-standard, and this is the initial cost. As with Pianoteq you could start up with the Stage and climb up to Pro with upgrades. And from there on, you maintain indefinitely your product updated at the cost of a mere 39$ every couple of years when they come up with a new version (and rather spending on new instruments). I do not have any info on their revenue, but if they can keep up with this, they can maintain the rhythm indefinitely. That's hard to beat. While on the case of the V-piano, the company may have to rely on resources they generate with other of their products. Even Intel failed doing that (and this recently) with some of its Atom processors, discontinuing a whole product line.

One major advantage with Modartt is that it doesn't make the hardwares, it is less prone to make products for a specific brand or makes or even platforms. Do you imagine Roland bragging about a software modeler used in its V-piano sold without its hardware? The moment a company which produce both the hardware and software start advertising the software it run at risk of opening the door to competitors offering substitutes to their own hardwares. All Modartt has to do is offering affordable products (solely softwares), keeping low profile and medium quality. That's basically all. smile

Last edited by Lucy (26-05-2017 14:37)

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Re: Piano V

aandrmusic wrote:

Don,
First let me express my appreciation for your fxp contributions, they are among the best I have tried.

Thanks smile

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Re: Piano V

Uhnn... I don't like the sound of this piano-V...  The tone, the harmonics...   I risk to say it's inferior to Pianoteq first testing version.

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Re: Piano V

Just downloaded it and spend around hour playing it, even forget to eat. Default presets are too mellow, especially in bass, but after adjusting hammers and velocity curve the pianos sound really not so bad for my ears. It have realistic sustain pedal action, half pedaling and repedaling, like Pianoteq, but unlike most expensive sampled pianos. I like it. Yes, it worse than Pianoteq 5, but I think it can have bright future.

I impressed not so much to buy it, but pretty much to save it on my PC and playing it sometimes. Demo version works 20 minutes without limitations.

Last edited by Ross (Yesterday 18:06)
Combine velocity curves: http://output.jsbin.com/cukeme/9