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Topic: Hummel's 1829 tuning

Hi, just wondering if there are any enthusiasts out there for this nearly-but-not-quite-equal temperament? (The scala file name is just 'hummel'). From time to time I like to try alternative tunings on the modern pianos as well as the historical instruments, and the other day I came across hummel and decided to load it into one of my Grotrian presets. I have to say, I really like it! It's a subtle difference, but it seems to bring out an extra richness and depth of character when compared with standard equal temperament. Well, that's just what I think. If you have Standard or Pro, give it a try. If you don't like it, at least you can quickly revert back to your preferred tuning!

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Re: Hummel's 1829 tuning

In the end, it comes down to what piece of music you are playing, and in what key you are playing it.  If a given tuning system happens to "lock in" for you, then so much the better, and I am hopeful you will continue enjoying it.

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Re: Hummel's 1829 tuning

dazric wrote:

Hi, just wondering if there are any enthusiasts out there for this nearly-but-not-quite-equal temperament? (The scala file name is just 'hummel'). From time to time I like to try alternative tunings on the modern pianos as well as the historical instruments, and the other day I came across hummel and decided to load it into one of my Grotrian presets. I have to say, I really like it! It's a subtle difference, but it seems to bring out an extra richness and depth of character when compared with standard equal temperament. Well, that's just what I think. If you have Standard or Pro, give it a try. If you don't like it, at least you can quickly revert back to your preferred tuning!

Could you post a sound demo that would let us hear this tuning?

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Re: Hummel's 1829 tuning

@Jake: I will upload a couple of fxps based on one of the default Grotrian presets so that you can 'test drive' the tuning to your own satisfaction, rather than listening to my random doodlings. There is a 'hummel 2' as well, which I haven't had much chance to try out, but there are some subtle differences there. In the fxps I have deliberately not altered anything except the tuning, because of course there are a number of other variables which can affect the sound of a piano. If you don't have the scala files, you will need to download them from http://www.huygens-fokker.org/scala/dow … tml#scales - when you have them, check in the 'advanced tuning' option to see that they have loaded correctly.

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Re: Hummel's 1829 tuning

dazric wrote:

@Jake: I will upload a couple of fxps based on one of the default Grotrian presets so that you can 'test drive' the tuning to your own satisfaction, rather than listening to my random doodlings. There is a 'hummel 2' as well, which I haven't had much chance to try out, but there are some subtle differences there. In the fxps I have deliberately not altered anything except the tuning, because of course there are a number of other variables which can affect the sound of a piano. If you don't have the scala files, you will need to download them from http://www.huygens-fokker.org/scala/dow … tml#scales - when you have them, check in the 'advanced tuning' option to see that they have loaded correctly.

I've placed them (Hummel and Hummel2)  in Other Files:
http://www.forum-pianoteq.com/uploads.php
smile

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Re: Hummel's 1829 tuning

Ah yes, placing the scalas in Other files makes things a bit simpler, thanks Don! Actually that's given me an idea. When I get a few spare moments at the piano I'll think about preparing a midi file that cycles through all the keys, specifically for testing tuning systems. There doesn't seem to be anything like that in the uploaded files, which is quite a surprise.
Hummel 1829 comes across as a pretty robust general-purpose system to me. Of course, there is no such thing as a 'perfect' tuning. B major seems to me to be very slightly 'off' in 1829, but not disturbingly so. IMO it's a price worth paying, to have that generally richer and more satisfying sound that I've already mentioned. Good old Hummel. He was no slouch as a composer, and he obviously knew a thing or two about tuning pianos too. The second temperament is even closer to equal, but still with something of that softening effect. Apparently it's based on the 'second bearing plan', which sounds as if it might be some sort of civil engineering project, but presumably it's a treatise on instrument tuning (my internet search on the subject has, so far, not yielded anything). I can't decide which system is 'better', but they certainly deserve to take their place in my 'virtual hall of pianos'.