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Topic: Fur Elise on the Broadwood

Hi,

When I play Fur Elise on the Breadwood I'm missing the notes in the high end. How did Beethoven play it then?

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Re: Fur Elise on the Broadwood

DeLange21 wrote:

Hi,

When I play Fur Elise on the Breadwood I'm missing the notes in the high end. How did Beethoven play it then?


Für Elise was not published until some 40 years after Beethoven's death, and the original manuscript has not survived. 

I believe the notes you are citing that were unplayable on Beethoven's Broadwood involved the run of A-minor arpeggios in the section just before the final return to the main theme: the A Minor arpeggios extend almost an octave higher than the pianos of the day.   Without the original manuscript to verify, it is only speculation that a few extra measures were inserted by the publisher, to extend those arpeggios upward to what is normally the highest E note on a modern piano.

Short answer to your question, 'How did Beethoven play it then?' -- He didn't.

Cheers,

Joe

Last edited by jcfelice88keys (24-12-2016 17:39)

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Re: Fur Elise on the Broadwood

"Für Elise" was written between 1808 and 1822 according to the Wikipedia entry.

At around 1810 the newest and largest grand pianos alreay had a range from F1 to F7.
The highest note in "Elise" ist E7, so Beethoven might had in mind the best instruments of his time.

There is a great book from piano & harpsichord collector Andreas Beurmann,
German title "Das Buch vom Klavier", which lists for example a beautiful grand piano from Jacob Bertsche, Vienna from 1813
with that range from F1 to F7.