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Topic: Which Pianoteq piano is your "go-to" instrument?

This is a selfish question.  I am curious if I am missing something (a setting or instrument) - especially after reading some of the other threads.  So I got to wondering what others used as their default PT piano.

For me, I use the Bluethner Model One AB with no changes.    But with 5.1 and all the positive D4 reviews I have started to mess around with it.

So, which instrument is your favorite for practicing and/or just sitting down and playing?

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Re: Which Pianoteq piano is your "go-to" instrument?

By fallback instruments are:
(1) for classical stuff: Blüthner Player with a few tweaks (speakers) or Blüthner Concert BA with increased dynamics (headphones);
(2) for Jazz and modern stuff: U4 Player (speakers) or U4 in Hall (headphones). smile

Pianoteq 5 Standard (D4, K2, U4, Blüthner, YC5, R2, W1, CL1, Kremsegg 1&2)

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Re: Which Pianoteq piano is your "go-to" instrument?

Blüthner Model One AB with 50db dynamics for classical practice...a little tweaking here and there (mics/binaural, some eq, some reverb, some profiling, much lower action noise).
Seems like the most realistic attack (still Pianoteq's weak point to my ears), although the D4 has improved. Best bass too on the Bluth model one I think...

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Re: Which Pianoteq piano is your "go-to" instrument?

Changes all the time. Every 2 weeks, the mood changes and I switch to the different default instrument/preset. Been using the Graf pianoforte since 5.1 update.

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Re: Which Pianoteq piano is your "go-to" instrument?

Not too far from your choice, Scorpio!) For practice my favorite is Bluthner - I use my "Bluthner Wood Chord"  preset from 4.5 version for now (spectrum-tweaked "Studio Recording" preset with Wav-impulse rever; most realistic for my ears). But after 5.1 patch, D4 seems to be more natural, and sometimes it becomes my choice.

Last edited by Kridlatec (14-10-2014 09:02)
Pianoteq 5 Standard (D4, K2, Blüthner, Model B, Grotrian)

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Re: Which Pianoteq piano is your "go-to" instrument?

Hello All,

My go-to choice is actually two piano models, both the AB Concert Recording versions of Blüthner and the Steinway D4.  For the longest time, I had thought it was the Blüthner, hands down -- for classical music repertoire.  The latest version of the D4 has given me pause to reconsider my choice.

So, rather than sticking with one and only one go to piano, I reserve the privilege to enjoy two piano models.  Now, most people are right to disagree with my choice of AB versus BA microphone channel reversal.  It is simply my own preference to enjoy listening to a classical music performance in a concert/recital setting, with the piano's keyboard essentially perpendicular to and positioned to the listeners' left sides.  A 9' grand piano's strings extend to my own listener's perspective of coming from the right side.  Similarly, I am used to hearing the hammers' noises and the performer's breathing to emanate from the left side.

* * * * * *

ASIDE:  When I used to sing with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, decades ago -- my own listening perspective was from "behind" the orchestra.  That is to say, the violins were to my right side, and the contrabasses were to my left side.  For more than a decade, I used to deliberately reverse the playing channels of all orchestral recordings, so as to be "in-sync" with my own personal listening perspective.  You may choose to agree or most certainly disagree with this practice (as I have since reverted back to listening to orchestral music with the violins towards the left), but is an option that is available to me. 

As with the orchestral panning (true or reversed channels), I am glad that Pianoteq offers the choice to do so from within the software.

Cheers,

Joe

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Re: Which Pianoteq piano is your "go-to" instrument?

Highly interesting read, Joe. (If my voice would not sound like a rusted watering can and I could have chosen my dream-orchestra, the experience would still have been different, as Klemperer put the violins1+2 to different sides)

I have not much time to play these days, and am a rotten amateur. Still it has the one advantage - you change the instruments and love different ones if you do not play daily, but every 3 weeks or so.

Favourites right now are a self-modelled Kremsegg-Bechstein with a "condition" not like new and perfect, but from 0.30 to 0.75 or even up to 0.85, horrible for many of course, but if you were used to an old not-perfect upright it just does not disturb me - quite to the contrary, I love it.

Then I love the Kremsegg instruments, in particular Streicher Frenzel and Pleyel, Erard, but all of them; I deliberately change the Broadwood to a certainly "not-like-broadwood" thicker sound, as after a while I simply found it too thin.

For music that has more "bite" in the upper registers I like a modified K2 very much, and of course the D4.

Nice to read many like the Bluethner. I love those "warmer" (well, words do not describe music so well) sounds in theory, but I have no clue why I rarely play the Bluethner, for me something is missing. Maybe I just try to get the Bechstein from Kremsegg and others inte the "it has to sound fuller and warmer" park too. So - if you can't play often, at least you'll enjoy that your favourite instruments will change more smile.

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Re: Which Pianoteq piano is your "go-to" instrument?

jcfelice88keys wrote:

most people are right to disagree with my choice of AB versus BA microphone channel reversal.

How are most pianos recorded, AB or BA? 

For the most part I use AB mics.  But I do that because it made sense after reading a reply you wrote in an earlier thread, Joe.  I appreciate all of your input from a tuner perspective.  In fact, I have looked back for many of your replies searching for nuggets of information.

I enjoy hearing what others use and experimenting with the FXP files that are graciously shared.  I am so inexperienced on tweaking a piano sound that when I change a parameter I do more harm than good.  Often I look for more clarity in the sound but maybe that is the nature of the beast, piano sound in general (not necessarily Pianoteq).

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Re: Which Pianoteq piano is your "go-to" instrument?

scorpio wrote:
jcfelice88keys wrote:

most people are right to disagree with my choice of AB versus BA microphone channel reversal.

How are most pianos recorded, AB or BA? 

For the most part I use AB mics.  But I do that because it made sense after reading a reply you wrote in an earlier thread, Joe.  I appreciate all of your input from a tuner perspective.  In fact, I have looked back for many of your replies searching for nuggets of information.

I enjoy hearing what others use and experimenting with the FXP files that are graciously shared.  I am so inexperienced on tweaking a piano sound that when I change a parameter I do more harm than good.  Often I look for more clarity in the sound but maybe that is the nature of the beast, piano sound in general (not necessarily Pianoteq).


Hello Mr. Scorpio,

Thank you for your kind words and remarks.  Much appreciated.

The terms AB and BA were invented by Modartt, as Left-Right and Right-Left channel orientations to denote how the sound seems to emanate from a piano, when it is miked from the side of the grand piano's case.  If you look on Youtube, you will find countless examples where two microphones are placed at the side of a grand piano's case.  When recording from this perspective, the left-hand microphone represents the left channel, and the right-hand microphone represents the right channel.  This is the standard "AB" recording configuration for Pianoteq and for commercial recordings of classical repertoire.

The good people at Modartt furnished us an alternate "BA" configuration in which the channels are reversed.  Why?  They did this because people who sit at the keyboard DO HEAR the low notes coming mostly from the left side of the piano, and the highest notes coming from the right side.  The AB (standard recording from the audience's perspective) microphone setting has been found to be disconcerting to some pianists, because the hammers' sounds and the highest notes seem to come from the audience's left side.  If you happen to be seated closely to the side of a long 9' piano, you WILL hear the lowest notes coming from the right side of your listening perspective.  (The further back one sits in a live concert hall, the more the piano's sound is perceived as "echoey mono".

My lifetime of listening to classical recordings has grown accustomed to what Modartt calls the AB channel orientation.  If you listen to stereo recordings of Glenn Gould's "vocal obligatto" aka "vocal embellishments" to his playing, you will ALWAYS hear his voice to originate from the left channel; this is a clear result of what Modartt calls the AB perspective of microphones positioned at the side of the grand piano.

Although my demos (Joseph Felice) that you hear on the Modartt website do NOT contain breathing noises, my own live personal recordings DO allow one to hear my breathing, and sometimes a piano bench squeak, to be heard from the left channel at times.  I specifically recall artifacts (not defects) of Rubenstein's breathing when he plays the Chopin Ballades, and of Serkin's breathing (he must have been asthmatic) when he performed Beethoven's Appassionata Sonata -- originating from the left channels of commercial recordings.

Cheers,

Joe

Last edited by jcfelice88keys (22-10-2014 16:56)

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Re: Which Pianoteq piano is your "go-to" instrument?

Just discovered the K2 Binaural preset for me. Wow! That'll be my go to headphone sound.

formerly known as Notyetconvinced

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Re: Which Pianoteq piano is your "go-to" instrument?

Just my 2 cents. I'm a very new user and was tremendously impressed by virtually all presets and instruments also tweaking them a lot but lately found myself naturally floating towards Bluethner, it is somehow sound more neutral and with an individuality at the same time. And of course I enjoy and need from time to time to be able to switch to something else. My impressions are very same as the others. Maybe I predict more D4 in the nearest future.

Andrei Kuznetsov

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Re: Which Pianoteq piano is your "go-to" instrument?

At the moment I play a lot with the Pleyel from 1926 in CLose Mic Binaural for my headphones.

Gives me such a smooth, intimate and clean sound. Second is the K2 Dreamy preset.

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Re: Which Pianoteq piano is your "go-to" instrument?

My default PT piano is also the Blüthner  (although here and there I've been exploring the "new" D4).
Cheers!

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Re: Which Pianoteq piano is your "go-to" instrument?

My default PT piano is also the Blüthner

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Re: Which Pianoteq piano is your "go-to" instrument?

I frequently change my mind... these days I'm playing the YC5 more than the others. Yamaha has a sweeter attack and I'm customizing my own presets. This is one thing I love about pianoteq, you eventually have your own sound...

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Re: Which Pianoteq piano is your "go-to" instrument?

geert wrote:

At the moment I play a lot with the Pleyel from 1926 in CLose Mic Binaural for my headphones.

Gives me such a smooth, intimate and clean sound. Second is the K2 Dreamy preset.

First one I've seen using the K2 presets besides me ! I use the Dreamy and an AB with various Hall Reverb changes ( often dull down the church Reverb setting) and lowered to 438Hz a lot for my own contemporary music I create. For other music I use a couple of different D4 setups. I use Vintage D quite a bit, Intimate quite a bit and Recording BA. I change almost all the pianos to 438 because I have some sensitive ears and my wife even more so. But also in the older vintage pianos I get more realism from 438 than from 440hz and certainly than from 442 ( for vintage instruments). Most old instruments never saw even 438 but maybe more like 432Hz, though that's getting too dull even for me sometimes..

I'm new to Pianoteq as of just last week so other than loving the C Bechstein I have not yet investigated too much outside of what I have setup thus far. The 20 minute demos keep running out on me, lol !!

Last edited by mp6in (12-11-2014 16:52)

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Re: Which Pianoteq piano is your "go-to" instrument?

Pianoteq D4 Blues "Pure" ( the name of my settings ) Uber Alles

Last edited by SteveKK (12-11-2014 17:11)

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Re: Which Pianoteq piano is your "go-to" instrument?

mp6in wrote:

I change almost all the pianos to 438 because I have some sensitive ears and my wife even more so. But also in the older vintage pianos I get more realism from 438 than from 440hz and certainly than from 442 ( for vintage instruments). Most old instruments never saw even 438 but maybe more like 432Hz, though that's getting too dull even for me sometimes..

Got me very interested, have two old pianos, sure they both lower than 440, both differently, though I don't mind it while playing. Looking forward to check this vintage tuning in Pianoteq.

Got from http://www.piano-tuners.org/history/pitch.html:

1640    Vienna Franciscan Organ A457.6
1699    Paris Opera A404
1711    John Shore's tuning fork, a pitch of A423.5 He invented the tuning fork, one of which still exists today.
1780    Stines, for Mozart, A421
1780    Organ builder Schulz A421.3
1714    Strasbourg Cathedral organ A391
1722    Dresden's chief Roman Catholic church organ A415
1759    Trinity College Cambridge organ A309
1762    Stringed instruments at Hamburg A405
1772    Gottfried Silbermann built the organ in the main Roman Catholic church in Dresden, and it had a pitch of A 415 at the time.
1780    Organ builder Schulz A421.3
1780    Stein's tuning fork A422.6
1751    Handel's own fork A422.5
1800    Broadwood's C fork, 505.7, which is about half a semitone lower than that of today
1811    Paris Grand Opera A 427
1812    Paris Conservatoire A440, as modern pitch
1813    George Smart adopted for the Philharmonic Society the pitch of A423.3.
1820    Westminster Abbey organ and possibly Paris Comic Opera used a pitch of A422.5.
1828    Philharmonic Society A 440
1834    Vienna Opera A 436.5
1835    Wolfels piano maker A443
1836    Pleyel's Pianos A446
1846    Philharmonic pitch was A452.5 (very high) which lasted till 1854
1846    Mr Hipkins piano tuner (Meantone) A433.5 (Equal) A436.0
1849    Broadwood's medium pitch was A445.9 which lasted till 1854
1858    New Philharmonic pitch C522
1860    Cramer's piano makers of London A448.4
1862    Dresden Opera A 440
1871    Covent Garden Opera House A 440
1877    Collard's piano maker standard pitch was A 449.9
1877    St. Paul Cathedral organ A446.6
1877    Chappell Pianos A455.9
1877    Mr Hipkins piano tuner A448.8
1878    Her Majesty's Organ A436.1
1878    Vienna Opera A447
1879    Covent Garden Opera A450
1879    Erard's factory fork 455.3
1879    Steinway of England A 454.
1879    British Army regulation pitch for woodwinds A451.9
1880    Brinsmead, Broadwood, and Erard apparently used a pitch of A455.3
1880    Steinway may have been using a pitch of A436. According to Steinway of New York, 1880 is right around the time they switched from three piece rims to the continuous rim that is used today. So it is unlikely the pitch was any higher before 1880, yet Steinway of London had a fork A454.7.
1885    In Vienna a pitch of A435.4 was adopted at a temperature of 59 degrees Fahrenheit for A.
1885    At an international exhibition of inventions and music in London a pitch of A452 was adopted.
1896    Philharmonic pitch A439, giving C522
1925    On the 11th of June the American music industry adopted A440.
1936    American Standards Association adopted A440. yet; New York Philharmonic and the Boston Symphony Orchestra, use 442 Hz
1939    At an international conference A440 was adopted.

Last edited by AKM (12-11-2014 17:30)
Andrei Kuznetsov

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Re: Which Pianoteq piano is your "go-to" instrument?

Here in Québec (city) our Palais Montcalm Concert Hall set its standard to A442, from the brand new Casavant concert organ, to its resident Steinways and harpsichord. The hall is home to the world renowned Violons du Roy baroque ensemble.

If you can read french, here are the specs: http://www.palaismontcalm.ca/wp-content … -jobin.pdf

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Re: Which Pianoteq piano is your "go-to" instrument?

Emil Gilels told, he loved to play few Hz higher. And once, when they recorded Piano Concertos with Szell, asked his piano tuner to tune Grand Piano in this way. Szell was not happy with it and always tried to "catch" Gilels at recording sessions. Finally pianist managed to elude conductors vigilance. "I took advantage of the fact that recording was at summer. When it is hot, brass musicians play a bit higher. As for violinists - they are always glad to play higher"

Pianoteq 5 Standard (D4, K2, Blüthner, Model B, Grotrian)

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Re: Which Pianoteq piano is your "go-to" instrument?

Modellingoptimist wrote:

Just discovered the K2 Binaural preset for me. Wow! That'll be my go to headphone sound.

Mhm, although it's nice I think I still prefer the D4 with Stereophonic output, for headphones as well. Seems as if Stereophonic output is worth considering more often wink.

formerly known as Notyetconvinced

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Re: Which Pianoteq piano is your "go-to" instrument?

What exactly is "stereophonic," anyway? The manual only makes one mention of it: "The stereophonic and monophonic modes are used with electro-acoustic instruments and also allow compatibility with previous Pianoteq versions." So the stereophonic mode for an electric piano would simply be the stereo outputs that exist on the real instrument? With a model of an acoustic instrument, from what perspective is this sound captured, and by what means?

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Re: Which Pianoteq piano is your "go-to" instrument?

matthew wrote:

What exactly is "stereophonic," anyway? The manual only makes one mention of it: "The stereophonic and monophonic modes are used with electro-acoustic instruments and also allow compatibility with previous Pianoteq versions." So the stereophonic mode for an electric piano would simply be the stereo outputs that exist on the real instrument? With a model of an acoustic instrument, from what perspective is this sound captured, and by what means?

http://www.forum-pianoteq.com/viewtopic … 66#p930566

formerly known as Notyetconvinced

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Re: Which Pianoteq piano is your "go-to" instrument?

YC5 4 mics

Allows me to follow Bach fugue voices with clarity

Plus it's an awesome piano wink have 'em all and it's my fave

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Re: Which Pianoteq piano is your "go-to" instrument?

Thank you for the link--very helpful.

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Re: Which Pianoteq piano is your "go-to" instrument?

Great information in here.  Thank you.

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Re: Which Pianoteq piano is your "go-to" instrument?

After searching for the "right" settings and/or fxp file, I have finally come to the sound I prefer.  It is quite simple.  And I have to thank Joe - jcfelice88keys - for the suggestion made on other threads here.  For any instrument, I set the volume to -6 and the dynamic slider to 36, it's perfect.  Everything else is left the same.  I still use the Bluethner as my main instrument.   I have to say, I am no longer wasting time tweaking.  I really enjoy PT5. 

The next issue is finding the right sound level to approximate that of an acoustic grand piano.  Suggestions?

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Re: Which Pianoteq piano is your "go-to" instrument?

My main sound is the "K2 close mic fig8", with the Dynamics increased to 45 and keys and pedal noises reduced to -6dB, in stereo mode.
I find the K2 to be the more neutral and well balanced instrument in comparison with the D4 and the Bluthner and then (my teacher's opinion) probably the best option for a low level piano "student" like me. He said: the D4 is too rich for you, using the K2 will help you to find your sound...
Sooooo.... K2

Last edited by stamkorg (04-01-2015 15:22)

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Re: Which Pianoteq piano is your "go-to" instrument?

Hi

Bluthner is my default piano, but now I bought U4(used the coupon), and my favorite there is U4 Tall. It reminds me(with some tweaking) of finnish Hellas B2 ballroom model. I played it many years in school.  No discussions about U4, anyway, I  like it much. It gives variation. Thank you Modartt.

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Re: Which Pianoteq piano is your "go-to" instrument?

My "go to" instrument is the D4 in the present version. I personally consider the sound of this model and of the real piano counterpart a sort of "standard" that fits well anything you throw at it.
The Bluethner is my second choice when I feel the warmer and fuller tone of this piano fits particularly well the piece (a tango, a duo with cello are few examples).
I didn't particularly like the tone of the K2 a the beginning but after playing with it a few weeks and doing some A/B comparisons with piano of the same size I started to appreciate it much more. I think the sounds fits particularly well modern jazz pieces where you need un upfront, "right in your face" sound or with proper adjustements some classical repertoire that is well suited for smaller venues (Scarlatti, Mozart or Clementi's Sonatas, Chopin's Nocturnes and Waltzes comes to mind).
I mainly use the Pleyel and the Erard mainly for early Jazz repertoire (Scott Joplin or Jelly Roll Morton) and sparely for the classical where I don't like that much their idiosincrasies. The Pleyel proved itself particularly useful for recreating the sound of Cortot's recordings.
Last but not least the U4: the model per se didn't surprise me but when I increased the string lenght to match the model I know I was surprised. It was very close and yet I cannot love it without hating it at the same time. I've spent so many hours (and I will probably spend more) playing on the U3 because it's my teacher's upright and just the sound immediatly reminds me hours of fatigue, eye-strain and such... This is the reason why I have mixed feelings about it. smile
The only model I am not so impressed so far it's the YC5 and in fact it's probably the only one I won't buy. The Yamaha tone it's in there but somehow this brand smaller models do not capture my sense of beauty and imagination that much. I feel models like a C7 or the top line CF/CX would have been a slightly better choice in this regard. But that's just me! wink

"And live to be the show and gaze o' the time."  (William Shakespeare)

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Re: Which Pianoteq piano is your "go-to" instrument?

scorpio wrote:

After searching for the "right" settings and/or fxp file, I have finally come to the sound I prefer.  It is quite simple.  And I have to thank Joe - jcfelice88keys - for the suggestion made on other threads here.  For any instrument, I set the volume to -6 and the dynamic slider to 36, it's perfect.  Everything else is left the same.  I still use the Bluethner as my main instrument.   I have to say, I am no longer wasting time tweaking.  I really enjoy PT5.

Hello Mr. Scorpio:

Thank you for the compliment regarding how we both (now) set our volume and dynamic range sliders -- much appreciated.  Likewise, I set the volume and dynamic range --- and go!  As it happens, Yours Truly tends to prefer the Concert Recording AB stock presets, or similar, without having to mess with microphone choice, EQ, reverb setting -- PT5 "just works" for me. Please note, however, that some of these presets came as the result of suggestions and gladful consideration by the Modartt team in response to my and other beta testers' suggestions.

Thanks to Philippe, Niclas, Julian, Evil Dragon, Beto Music, Jake, Gilles ... and the list goes on and on!


Cheers,

Joe

Last edited by jcfelice88keys (05-01-2015 00:53)

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Re: Which Pianoteq piano is your "go-to" instrument?

Although I find the Bluethner and D4 pianos perhaps more realistic, the K2 may actually be more expressive, with the K2 Under Lid best replicating the pianist's position (but this is just my ears).

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Re: Which Pianoteq piano is your "go-to" instrument?

hallgee wrote:

Although I find the Bluethner and D4 pianos perhaps more realistic, the K2 may actually be more expressive, with the K2 Under Lid best replicating the pianist's position (but this is just my ears).


Hello Mr. HallGee,

That's the beauty of Pianoteq:  it's something for everyone.

The more I think about it, Pianoteq reminds me of a computer, in and of itself, regarding the way it fulfills various users' needs.  A computer (via good software, of course) may be configured as a word processor, a spreadsheet, a mathematical toolkit, a musical instrument sampler, and a host for Pianoteq, etc., etc.

Pianoteq, for me, takes the computer metaphor even further -- allowing us to tweak instruments in ways we each prefer, rather than the one-size-fits-all sampler route.

Cheers,

Joe

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Re: Which Pianoteq piano is your "go-to" instrument?

80% D4 daily 20% Blüthner daily, both with modified dynamic and EQ.

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Re: Which Pianoteq piano is your "go-to" instrument?

Any updates to the piano you use the most, these days?  I really enjoy hearing what others are using.

For me,
40% Model B (Recording 2)
60% Bluethner (Model One AB)

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Re: Which Pianoteq piano is your "go-to" instrument?

Grotrian, Steinway B, Blüthner -- somewhat equally over time.

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Re: Which Pianoteq piano is your "go-to" instrument?

depends on the repertoire i'm playing, but my "go-to's" (with custom fxp setups) include:

1624 Ruckers, a¹ = 392 Hz, Artusi (1603)
1624 Ruckers, a¹ = 392 Hz, 1/5 comma French meantone
1624 Ruckers, a¹ = 403 Hz, Mersenne meantone I (1636)
1624 Ruckers, a¹ = 415 Hz, Kirnberger I (1766)
1697 Grimaldi, a¹ = 395 Hz, Werckmeister III (1681)
1697 Grimaldi, a¹ = 415 Hz, Lehman III (2006)
1697 Grimaldi, a¹ = 422.5 Hz, Handel (1780)
1733 Blanchet, a¹ = 404 Hz, Couperin modified meantone (1690)
1733 Blanchet, a¹ = 407 Hz, Rameau ordinaire (1726)
1779 Neupert, a¹ = 415 Hz, Lehman II (2005)
1790 Schantz, a¹ = 430 Hz, Vallotti (1781)
1790 Schantz, a¹ = 430 Hz, Young II (1799)
1790 Walter, a¹ = 421.6 Hz, Vallotti (1781)
1790 Walter, a¹ = 432 Hz, Vallotti (1781)
1796 Broadwood, a¹ = 422.7 Hz, Young II (1799)
"1803 Erard" (based on the 1796 Broadwood), a¹ = 432 Hz, Young I (1800)
1826 Graf, a¹ = 438 Hz, Bemetzrieder (1808)
1826 Graf, a¹ = 438 Hz, Young (1807)
1835 Pleyel, a¹ = 441 Hz, Jousse quasi-equal (1832)
1835 Pleyel, a¹ = 441 Hz, Broadwood unequal (1832)
1849 Erard, a¹ = 446 Hz, Jousse well (1832)
1849 Erard ("Lucerne"), a¹ = 435 Hz, Neidhardt-Marpurg-de Morgan (1858)
1852 Streicher, a¹ = 452.5 Hz, Neidhardt-Marpurg-de Morgan (1858)
1852 Streicher, a¹ = 452.5 Hz, Hummel quasi-equal 'Viennese' (1829)
"1884 Steinway D-274 (New York)" (based on the Bluethner), a¹ = 457 Hz, Ellis (1875)
"1894 Erard" (based on the 1922 Erard), a¹ = 442.4 Hz, Pyle equal-beating (1906)
1899 Bechstein, a¹ = 440 Hz, EBV
"1900 Bösendorfer" (based on the Bluethner), a¹ = 440 Hz, ET
"1900 Bösendorfer" (based on the Bluethner), a¹ = 440 Hz, Lehman III (2006)

Last edited by DaveyJones (24-02-2017 03:27)
Wahre Kunst bleibt unvergänglich.

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Re: Which Pianoteq piano is your "go-to" instrument?

[non contributory tangent]
What the heck does "go-to" mean, anyway"? Does that just mean "favourite"? In that case, why not just say "what is your favourite piano"?

Greg.

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Re: Which Pianoteq piano is your "go-to" instrument?

skip wrote:

[non contributory tangent]
What the heck does "go-to" mean, anyway"? Does that just mean "favourite"? In that case, why not just say "what is your favourite piano"?

i suppose that one of the nice (or infuriating, depending on one's perspective) things about the english language is it's broad array of words (including such neologisms as /go-to/) available for any given idea... so why just say "favorite"?  why not "beloved", "cherished", "main", "popular", "prized", "treasured", "darling", "dear", "pet", "admired", "adored", "esteemed", "precious", "revered", etc etc...??

Wahre Kunst bleibt unvergänglich.

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Re: Which Pianoteq piano is your "go-to" instrument?

I'd prefer any of those to "go-to". But thanks, point taken. smile

Greg.

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Re: Which Pianoteq piano is your "go-to" instrument?

skip wrote:

[non contributory tangent]
What the heck does "go-to" mean, anyway"? Does that just mean "favourite"? In that case, why not just say "what is your favourite piano"?

As a native (Australian) English speaker, using "go-to" implies more meaning than favourite, like reliable/dependable.. "the best tool for the job". The job we're talking about here is no doubt a personally satisfying piano sound, so "favourite" was probably appropriate, considering how subjective sound can be. The OP even used the word favourite in their question.

Back on topic though, my "go-to" piano would currently be the Grotrian (previously the Model B). However, certain presets have definite value for me. The K2 3 Mics preset is great for a bass-heavy low-end, and doesn't get muddy with repeatedly pressed keys with sustain on. I love the D4 and Model B Dreamy presets, and, the Model B Cosmic preset, each letting me play a certain style of music.

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Re: Which Pianoteq piano is your "go-to" instrument?

Hi Lem18 - "go-to" implication is same here in South Carolina as Australia apparently.  I do not know about North Carolina or Texas!

LOL

Lanny

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Re: Which Pianoteq piano is your "go-to" instrument?

Formerly Model B, now Grotrian and Blüthner.

Pianoteq 5 with Blüthner Model One / Grotrian Concert Royal / Hohner Collection / Vintage Electric Pianos

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Re: Which Pianoteq piano is your "go-to" instrument?

This "go-to" discussion is amusing.   I believe the issue is the hyphen.

We have a selection of pianos in front of us each day via Pianoteq.  When you sit down to play,
which one do you go to, which one do you sit down and play? 

Which instrument and preset is your default piano, which one do you mostly use?

For me, I appreciate hearing what others are using as it forces me to question my own bias.

Thank you all!

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Re: Which Pianoteq piano is your "go-to" instrument?

lem18 wrote:

Back on topic though, my "go-to" piano would currently be the Grotrian (previously the Model B). However, certain presets have definite value for me. The K2 3 Mics preset is great for a bass-heavy low-end, and doesn't get muddy with repeatedly pressed keys with sustain on. I love the D4 and Model B Dreamy presets, and, the Model B Cosmic preset, each letting me play a certain style of music.

This is terrific, thank you.

I have yet to purchase the Grotrian, it seems clear that I am missing something.  I have tested it, but have not given this piano enough time.

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Re: Which Pianoteq piano is your "go-to" instrument?

Hi Scorpio - the Grotrian is exceptional - particularly IMHO, the Grotrian Recording 3 preset.  Anyone who favors the "big" pianos would like it.

Regards,  Lanny

PS:  I "went-to" the Grotrian after playing the Bluethner but the Grotrian has some newer PTQ secret "stuff" that really makes it have presence.  The more of these wonderful pianos you have the less you would want to "go-to" any sampled piano!  ;p)

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Re: Which Pianoteq piano is your "go-to" instrument?

I've been using Model B, but I think I'll test out Grotrian and Blüthner.

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Re: Which Pianoteq piano is your "go-to" instrument?

LTECpiano, based on your Grotrian comments I went off and played around with it some more.  I ended up
purchasing it, and I don't regret it.  Right now it is the piano I am using ... truly remarkable instrument.
Thank you.

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Re: Which Pianoteq piano is your "go-to" instrument?

scorpio wrote:

LTECpiano, based on your Grotrian comments I went off and played around with it some more.  I ended up
purchasing it, and I don't regret it.  Right now it is the piano I am using ... truly remarkable instrument.
Thank you.

Hey Scorpio (guessing the same over at PW) - now I want to buy it smile

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Re: Which Pianoteq piano is your "go-to" instrument?

Grotrian for me all the time. I switch back to some other one from time to time (Blüthner or the Erard Grand usually) but always switch back after a few minutes. Can't will till they update all the pianos to the same level of quality the Grotrian has.